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NTNU STUDENTS BUILD AT NIDELVEN

The municipality of Trondheim wishes to tie the city closer to the water and to vitalize the old ware houses. The open, public area along Nidelven is where the historic harbor once was and where commodities were exchanged and stored. Here activities will take place during the conference. Architect students at NTNU will be engaged on many levels. They will hold a DesignAndMake – workshop in the beginning of august where 10-15 students from different classes in the cause of a fortnight will design and build a preliminary staircase from Kjøpmannsgata and down to the public area below along Nidelven. This project is initiated by themselves and is lead by the four students Kristin Solhaug Ness, Kristoffer Olsen Hauge, Anders Gunleiksrud and John Haddal Mork.

The two last mentioned are also involved in the other project during the conference, a built construction with has the form of a jetty protruding into the river from The Kings Public Place and where The Municipality of Trondheim is the employer. The project is part of the spring course at NTNU where the goal is to challenge both the wood industry and old conventions within the trade.

One of the targets with the project is to use digital tools both in the process and in the production to raze the level of precision in the detailing and thereby minimize faults and increase the efficiency of mounting on site. The plan is to have a close collaboration with the other faculties at the University in addition to SINTEF among other being involved in the process where a stretch test of the construction is to be executed.  The actual building process will be done together Snekkeriet Verdal.

The Municipality of Trondheim has been involved in both the projects including being an employer which the students have been very pleased with.

It’s been great to find and fulfill a need at the same time as we have had substantial benefit of learning. We hope it may develop into a deeper collaboration between The Municipality and architect students in the future too, says John Haddal Mork.